Three lacy socks - one white, one pink, and one brown - are laid flat on a white marble countertop with two doilies and some white roses. These are the Bricolage Socks, the Cromulent Socks, and the Parnassian Socks.

The Bricolage Socks, Cromulent Socks, and Parnassian Socks are finally available on Payhip, Etsy, and Ravelry. Here you’ll find links to all three sock knitting patterns on all three platforms, as well as information about the inspiration behind these knit sock designs, how much yarn you’ll need, the sizes they come in, and more.

PAYHIP:

Here’s where you’ll find the Bricolage Socks.

Here’s where you’ll find the Cromulent Socks

Here’s where you’ll find the Parnassian Socks.

To take 15% off your purchase through Sunday, July 11, use the code EYELETS.

ETSY:

Here’s where you’ll find the Bricolage Socks.

Here’s where you’ll find the Cromulent Socks

Here’s where you’ll find the Parnassian Socks.

All three patterns are 15% off through Sunday, July 11. Discount automatically applied at checkout.

RAVELRY:

Here’s where you’ll find the Bricolage Socks.

Here’s where you’ll find the Cromulent Socks

Here’s where you’ll find the Parnassian Socks.

The pattern is 15% off through Sunday, July 11. Discount automatically applied at checkout.

About the The Bricolage Socks, Cromulent Socks, and Parnassian Socks

A few months back, I decided to make a mini collection of socks that played with a central theme. Each of these socks uses an eight-stitch repeat, but each repeat has a different number of eyelets. More specifically, the Parnassian Socks use one eyelet, the Cromulent Socks use two eyelets, and the Bricolage Socks use three eyelets.

I also knew I wanted to team up with Camellia Fiber Company again for this project. Silbia Ro, the owner and creative director, has a deft hand with colors that perfectly fit into the soft, dreamy aesthetic I prefer. She’s also a joy to work with, so I’m always on the lookout for projects we can tackle together!

Finally, I knew I wanted these socks to be made with sport-weight yarn, not the usual fingering-weight yarn. I had several reasons for that. Most importantly, I really wanted some socks that were extra squishy, so I could snuggle up while reading a book and not have cold toes (my toes are always, always cold). I also thought it would be nice to release some socks that knit up quickly so people can use them for gift knitting. Just as importantly, I wanted to have socks that are good for beginners to play around with, and thicker socks are a little easier to learn on.

Because if there’s one thing I’m passionate about sharing with other knitters, it’s the joy of knitting socks.

Sock Knitting Pattern Details and Specs

Each of these knit socks has the same basic specs, so the difference is all in the stitch arrangements. Here’s what you’ll need to make any one of these knit sock patterns:

SIZES
S, M, L

Finished sock dimensions: 8” (20.5 cm), 9.25” (23.5 cm), 10.25” (26 cm) circumference (Note: most people like their socks snug, so choose a finished sock size that is slightly smaller than your actual foot)

MATERIALS
Sport weight yarn, 230 (262, 295) yds / 211 (240, 270) m

Sample shown knit in Camellia Fiber Co. CFC Merino Sport, 100% merino wool, 325 yds (297 m) per 3.5 oz (100 g), colorway Dahlia
GAUGE 4” (10 cm) square = 28 stitches and 36 rows in stockinette after blocking

NEEDLES
One set of needles for your preferred style of small-circumference knitting in a size to match gauge listed above

Suggested needle size: US 4 (3.5 mm)

TOOLS
One stitch marker for beginning of round; optional additional markers between pattern repeats
Tapestry needle for weaving in ends

SKILL LEVEL
Intermediate

Techniques: decreases, knitting in the round, Kitchener stitch grafting

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